4 edition of Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO found in the catalog.

Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO

Werden und Entwicklung

  • 433 Want to read
  • 1321 Currently reading

Published by Administrator in U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station


      • Download Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO Book Epub or Pdf Free, Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO, Online Books Download Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO Free, Book Free Reading Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO Online, You are free and without need to spend extra money (PDF, epub) format You can Download this book here. Click on the download link below to get Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO book in PDF or epub free.

      • WES authors: James M. Brannon, Patrick Deliman, Carlos Ruiz, Cynthia Price, Mohammed Qasim.Includes bibliographical references: (p. 17-19).Final report.

        StatementU.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station
        PublishersU.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1999
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 111 p. :
        Number of Pages72
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1
        2Technical report (U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station) -- IRRP-99-1.
        3Technical report -- IRRP-99-1.

        nodata File Size: 6MB.


Share this book
You might also like

Conceptual model and process descriptor formulations for fate and transport of UXO by U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Download PDF EPUB FB2


abstraktion.co.uk's Document Library

At one military installation in the eastern US, surface and underlying soils have significant HE contamination as a result of more than 50 years of live-fire training. Static experiments ran for 9 weeks to determine the fate of the combined explosive constituents in soil by monitoring the rate of degradation.

Composition B Comp B is a commonly used military formulation composed of the toxic explosive compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene TNTand hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine RDX. To obtain more quantitative information as well as to provide potential prediction methods, dissolution models have also been developed [6,7,10,11,21].

Two similar approaches were used for modeling dissolution of HE particles in the soil columns; one included dispersion in the bulk liquid phase, while the other did not. The yield of a detonation is the fraction of HE that detonates. Any type of detonation deposits HE residues on the ground surface. In addition ET corrects the adiponectin responsiveness of CACs, and thereby might promote endogenous repair of damaged endothelium. Most of the information available on fate and transport of explosives is for the subsurface environment.2002a, Lynch et al.

Cycling between flow and no-flow conditions had a small effect on the dissolution rates and effluent concentrations; however, TNT dissolution from Comp B was enhanced under intermittent-flow conditions.2002 reported dissolution kinetics of HE compounds and formulations in batch reactors and found that dissolution rates generally increased with temperature and particle surface area. Adipo improves the migratory capacity of CACs in response to SDF1, partially through an upregulation of CXCR4.

Two HE formulations, C4 and Comp B, were studied to determine RDX, HMX, and TNT dissolution rates, and a dissolution model that included advection, dispersion, and film transfer resistance was developed to estimate steady state effluent concentrations. the pure crystals of TNT, RDX, and HMX, or their mixed residues, e.

Dissolution kinetics of high explosives particles in a saturated sandy soil

Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. Contamination of military ranges by the use of explosives can lead to irreversible environmental damage, specifically to soil and groundwater.

TNT demonstrated the fastest dissolution rate followed by HMX and then RDX. Residues dissolve through the direct impact of precipitation events, by flowing surface runoff, or by percolating soil pore water.