17.05.2021 | History

1 edition of Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos found in the catalog.

Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos

Nambe, Picuris, Pojoaque, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Clara, Taos, Tesuque

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Published by Administrator in High Desert Field Guides

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  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • High Desert Field Guides


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      • Title from cover.Written by Dick and Kathryn Huelster with the assistance of Lynn Cline and others.Dial-a-Dance mounted on inside back cover.Includes bibliographical references (p. 28).

        StatementHigh Desert Field Guides
        PublishersHigh Desert Field Guides
        Classifications
        LC Classifications2005
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 83 p. :
        Number of Pages63
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 100976683903
        Series
        1nodata
        2
        3

        nodata File Size: 1MB.


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Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos by High Desert Field Guides Download PDF EPUB FB2


First, there are the seven Keresan-speaking pueblos: Acoma. The clown-priest phase is universal among all the pueblos, but the grotesquetie varies. Operations at El Vado also closed as towns disappeared as quickly as the forests.

Dance Ceremonies of the Northern Rio Grande Pueblos

These dyes are relatively permanent and cannot be washed out, as can the inorganic types. Several religious playlets have been devised from sixteenth-century ecclesiastical drama, but these are costumed in accordance with modern Indian ingenuity and provide nothing of interest in the way of native ceremonial dress.

In former days another major activity of the Pueblos was hunting, for the obtaining of food and skins. It was obvious he had passion for geology. In the 20th century, however, attempts by residents of nearby pueblos to enter the American-controlled turquoise mines culminated in the 1911 arrest, prosecution, and imprisonment of four men from Cochiti Pueblo.

A performance may pantomime the story of a certain culture hero, or a legendary figure, or it may exhibit a pageant of numerous and varied characters. Instead of Cibola, what he actually found was the ancestral Zuni pueblo of Hawikuh. At Hopi, also, the branches are planted and the children are amazed, when they awaken, to find "trees" growing in the plaza—a phenomenon explained as one which accompanies the supernaturals who are about to dance there.

At Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos, when the sacred image is couched in a temporary bower of tall cornstalks and evergreens, the typical Indian dance is performed in its honor. Certain plants and herbs still provide flavoring, and from others are obtained colors and adhesive gums used for dyeing materials and decorating masks.

For these a smaller loom is required, which also differs slightly from that used for large fabrics. The temperature is fluctuating: intense heat of the summer day is mitigated by cool nights, and the hardship caused by the few winter storms is more than alleviated by the many days of unbroken sunshine.

To better defend villages from Indian attack, churches and houses were built around a plaza, but only the hardiest settlers stayed on. All dances are also accompanied by songs or chants sung by a chorus or by the dancers themselves. One of the most visited pueblos in northern New Mexico pop. Berkeley: University of California Press, c1991 1991. Still, nearly a century after the colony was established, there were fewer than 3,000 Spanish inhabitants in the entire province.

There are many elders, children, and animals in the villages.